Category: Investigations

Latest Investigations by The World Art News journalists into the intriguing world of Art, Antiques, and Collectibles.

How to Make Art a Career: The Three Golden Questions to Ask Yourself

Take steps. Small steps. If you want a career to be long-lasting you don’t want to force something to grow. Building a career is just like growing a plant. It needs to be planted in good soil and taken care of while it’s still small and unknown to the world. It has to get love and the right nutrition to be able to function and to live up to its potential as a bigger plant. 

Do not rush. I can’t emphasize this enough. Yes, you need to throw yourself out there and be willing to do things that scare you, but you should never compromise with your own health – mental, physical or spiritual – nor should you lower your morals or let go of your integrity in order to get to where you want to go. This needs to be intact and if you are a solid artist your career will take off in the time you are ready for it. 

The Problem with NFTs

Around February of this year, in the midst of the still-pending cryptocurrency boom, a sub-category of digital assets started to really take off. NonFungible.com reported that by the first quarter of 2021, over $2 billion worth of transactions had taken place in the NFT market. Musician Grimes sold almost $6 million worth of digital art via digital asset marketplace Nifty Gateway, who are partnered with Sotheby’s. Twitter founder Jack Dorsey auctioned his first ever tweet as an NFT, the final bid closing at $2.9 million. UFC Heavyweight Champion Francis Ngannou sold NFTs following his knockout victory over Stipe Miocic. The proceeds of the sale, $580,000, was actually more than his disclosed purse for the fight itself that earned him the belt. Despite the hype, in many regards serving as a speculator’s dream, NFTs come with inherent issues that threaten to hamper widespread and enduring adoption.

THE SHIGIR IDOL – Is this 10,000 BC Artifact Worth Half a Billion Dollars?

Imagine for a moment, that you are a miner in Siberia at the end of the nineteenth century, slogging with your colleagues through the moss-laden, muck-infused waters of the mire in search of gold, only to stumble upon something far more rare. This is precisely what occurred in 1890, within the Sverdlovsk region of Russia’s Ural Mountains, when a team of laborers who were busy excavating a peat bog inadvertently discovered a strange and ornate wooden figure featuring an eerie human face. Resting at an approximate depth of four meters beneath the surface of the acidic, oxygen-low, and therefore anti-bacterial conditions of the bog that had preserved it, the mysterious object that would come to be known as the “Shigir Idol” (named after the Shigir bog it was found within) was discovered in a series of 10 fragments.

How Professor Mikhail Tamoikin Survived Kidnapping and Torture in Ukraine, then a Mob Hit in Lithuania

In August of 2015 Mikhail Tamoikin was kidnapped at gunpoint in the center of Kiev, chained and dragged into a car, taken to a boat, where he was beaten and tortured. Miraculously he managed to escape by jumping into the river and swimming for 12 km to safety. After calling the local police, Mikhail quickly learned that the corrupt Ukrainian government officials and “on the take” law enforcement officers were responsible for his kidnapping. Prof. Tamoikin managed to barely get out of Ukraine, moving to Lithuania, but that did not stop this international criminal candidate. Just two months later a second attempt on his life took place. An unmarked car with a masked driver intentionally hit Mikhail in Vilnius city, and when he survived that, these criminals, dressed as policemen, tried to finish the job.

Ilya Glazunov’s Russian Nationalism | Hokkaido University

Although lately Western scholars have begun to pay attention to various manifestations of the rise of ethnic Russian nationalism as distinct from official “Soviet patriotism” they have virtually ignored the phenomenon of Il’ia Glazunov, a Soviet painter who is also a foremost protagonist of that nationalism. The chief reason for this lack of scholarly interest lies in the fact that not only has Glazunov been a controversial figure but he was also accused of Russian chauvinism, anti-Semitism, and of being a KGB agent.

Is Art Financing Terrorism?

Art and terrorism seem to be worlds apart, however what most people perceive as heritage and culture – criminal organizations see as cold hard cash. Cash that is hard to trace and very easy to move undetected through the borders of any country. Authorities worldwide must weak up and treat this as a major security threat!