Tag: Central Europe

GemGenève is Back in November … with Fabergé!

GemGenève

GENEVA, 23 AUGUST 2022 – It’s official! By popular demand from its exhibitors, GemGenève is holding a second, exceptional edition again this year in Geneva. “We had initially planned to hold only one edition, in May 2022. Following calls from our exhibitors, we´ve decided to organize a second edition in autumn 2022 in Geneva, but this shouldn’t become standard practice in the future”, emphasizes Ronny Totah.

The 5th meeting of gemology and jewellery professionals and enthusiasts will therefore open its doors from Thursday, 3rd November to Sunday, 6th November in Palexpo, this time in Hall 6. It will coincide once again with the major autumnal auction sales of the Geneva Luxury Week.

The Great Spadolini – Dance, Art & Espionage

The Spy with License to Dance … and Paint!

This isn’t a fictional book by Ian Fleming, nor an imaginary film about the world’s most famous secret agent.

The “James Bond” we’re talking about here is Italian, and his name is Alberto Spadolini (1907 – 1972).

He was sexy and daring like 007, surrounded by fascinating women and celebrities of the international jet set, continually moving between different milieux – showbiz, politics, sophisticated circles, and war scenarios.

The only difference is – he was real.

Figurative Painting Will Never Die!

Boglarka NAGY International Biennale Danube Contemporary 22 3

Artist Talk with Boglarka Nagy at the International Biennale for Contemporary Art from Central Europe.

The young painter Boglarka Nagy is representing the new generation of painters, who are concentrated on figurative art.

In July she visited the Transylvanian artist village Cisnadioara near Sibiu, where she is representing Hungary at the International Biennale “Danube Contemporary 22 – Shapes and Personality”.

In discussion with an audience of art connoisseurs from France, England, Greece, Switzerland, Germany and Romania, Nagy described her work as a permanent strive for excellence.

Central and Eastern European Art: A Veiled Treasure

The global Art market is undergoing change as the world continues its progression towards globalization. That specific change is the diversification of a predominantly Western Art market. This is phenomenal, but it’s also about time because it means that the Art market is finally beginning to include and value Art of all the different cultures that make up humanity. Now, not every culture or type of Art is valued or held to the same caliber yet, but we are getting there. 

One of the regions that still appears to be struggling to break into the Art Market is Central and Eastern Europe. Which is problematic because it leaves a massive gap in our understanding of Art movements, and how we are where we are in contemporary Art today. So, in order to understand what Central and Eastern European Art is, you will first need to understand what distinguishes the region from the rest of Europe. 

€1 Million Encaustic Gold Art Collection from Michael Gavrieli

Michael Gavrieli is a luxury artist from Europe, who creates exclusive art for high-end clientele. Mixing 24 karat gold and fine silver with hot, coloured bee wax, Michael paints unique encaustic artworks in the style of the ancient Romans that you won’t find anywhere else.

An exclusive “Encaustic Gold Edition” collection, valued at €1,000,000, will be exhibited at the Amber Lounge Fashion Show during Monaco Grand Prix next year, followed by an action of these one-of-a-kind paintings. Symbolizing power, energy, wealth, and iconic status, this golden art collection is bound to last for centuries. At the center of the exhibition there will be Michael Gavrieli’s masterpiece: “The Golden Phoenix,” the most expensive 24 karat gold encaustic artwork in the world.

Women in Art: A glimpse into Central & Eastern Europe

Whilst women have always been an essential topic in the visual arts they have historically been excluded from the entire artistic canon. That is not to say that women have not participated in the creation of Art, rather that the Western canon solely includes the work of men. To be more specific, the Western artistic canon includes and values the works of Western men only.

One might think that it makes perfect sense the Western Art canon is inclusive of male artists considering the fact that the first wave of feminism only begun around the late 19th century. So, before that, women weren’t really a part of many industries. Also, as stated in the name, the western Art canon is in fact “western” and does not proclaim to be the “global” art canon.