Tag: Eastern Europe

Top 10 Jewelry Pieces from Igor Carl Fabergé to be Exhibited for the First Time at GemGenève

While the popular knowledge about the Fabergé is focused on the Imperial Easter Eggs, commissioned by the Russia Royal family and other famous patrons, the Igor Carl Fabergé Foundation decided to offer a different approach by presenting “New Finds” and little known items as a point of departure for this exhibition. By presenting more than 100 pieces from private collections, the Igor Carl Fabergé Foundation is offering a glimpse into the richness and versatility of the Fabergé workshops.

Many collected rarities have not been previously shown in Switzerland or Europe at large and some are being presented for the first time!

Figurative Painting Will Never Die!

Boglarka NAGY International Biennale Danube Contemporary 22 3

Artist Talk with Boglarka Nagy at the International Biennale for Contemporary Art from Central Europe.

The young painter Boglarka Nagy is representing the new generation of painters, who are concentrated on figurative art.

In July she visited the Transylvanian artist village Cisnadioara near Sibiu, where she is representing Hungary at the International Biennale “Danube Contemporary 22 – Shapes and Personality”.

In discussion with an audience of art connoisseurs from France, England, Greece, Switzerland, Germany and Romania, Nagy described her work as a permanent strive for excellence.

Who is Leonid Lindin

Leonid is one of the most skilled and imaginative precisionism artists in Europe. He he is also a hopeless romantic who uses his talent to paint spectacular fantasy scenes, often with oil on large canvases. Leonid’s artworks take time and anyone who had the pleasure to see them up-close was undoubtedly amazed by his attention to detail.

While Leonid’s favorite genre is seascapes, there are no limits to his imagination. If in real life he is a very modest man, in his art Leonid ventures into far corners of distant galaxies, sails over oceans and seas, and goes into wild winter forest of the north, not to mention the female beauty that occasionally comes to life on his canvas. A true romantic, Leonid paints romance like no one else.

Who is Yuri Tarasov

Yuri Tarasov was one of the strongest painters in the Soviet Union, Russia and Lithuania. While his talent had no borders, Yuri’s fantastic vision and ability to show the true classic Russian art school with a touch of modern European trends made his paintings highly controversial in the Soviet society. As the son of the Head of the Supreme Council of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, he had an opportunity to become one of the best-know artists in the USSR, but Yuri never wanted fame or money, strongly believing that great art must bring recognition and not the other way around. Ignoring the opportunities life gave him, committed only to his art and his family, Yuri Tarasov, nevertheless, became one of the top artists in the entire Soviet Union. The recognition that he so carefully avoided inevitably came to him after each and every one of his exhibitions. His art spoke for itself.

Central and Eastern European Art: A Veiled Treasure

The global Art market is undergoing change as the world continues its progression towards globalization. That specific change is the diversification of a predominantly Western Art market. This is phenomenal, but it’s also about time because it means that the Art market is finally beginning to include and value Art of all the different cultures that make up humanity. Now, not every culture or type of Art is valued or held to the same caliber yet, but we are getting there. 

One of the regions that still appears to be struggling to break into the Art Market is Central and Eastern Europe. Which is problematic because it leaves a massive gap in our understanding of Art movements, and how we are where we are in contemporary Art today. So, in order to understand what Central and Eastern European Art is, you will first need to understand what distinguishes the region from the rest of Europe. 

€1 Million Encaustic Gold Art Collection from Michael Gavrieli

Michael Gavrieli is a luxury artist from Europe, who creates exclusive art for high-end clientele. Mixing 24 karat gold and fine silver with hot, coloured bee wax, Michael paints unique encaustic artworks in the style of the ancient Romans that you won’t find anywhere else.

An exclusive “Encaustic Gold Edition” collection, valued at €1,000,000, will be exhibited at the Amber Lounge Fashion Show during Monaco Grand Prix next year, followed by an action of these one-of-a-kind paintings. Symbolizing power, energy, wealth, and iconic status, this golden art collection is bound to last for centuries. At the center of the exhibition there will be Michael Gavrieli’s masterpiece: “The Golden Phoenix,” the most expensive 24 karat gold encaustic artwork in the world.

Women in Art: A glimpse into Central & Eastern Europe

Whilst women have always been an essential topic in the visual arts they have historically been excluded from the entire artistic canon. That is not to say that women have not participated in the creation of Art, rather that the Western canon solely includes the work of men. To be more specific, the Western artistic canon includes and values the works of Western men only.

One might think that it makes perfect sense the Western Art canon is inclusive of male artists considering the fact that the first wave of feminism only begun around the late 19th century. So, before that, women weren’t really a part of many industries. Also, as stated in the name, the western Art canon is in fact “western” and does not proclaim to be the “global” art canon.

Czeslaw Znamierowski – Multicultural Artist from the Soviet Union

“For him there were no boundaries between nationalities. He readily made friends with the natives of any country…. He was no stranger to Latvians, Lithuanians, Jews, Tatars, Karaites, Russians. He was ready to help everyone if possible.”

At a time of great division in the Eastern European community a lesson in multiculturalism, unity and brotherhood can be learned from an unusual person, a Soviet Lithuanian artist Czeslaw Znamierowski (23 May 1890 – 9 August 1977). He was born in Imperial Russia on Latvian territory into a Polish family. At the age of 32 he became a citizen of the Soviet Union and soon after moved permanently to Lithuania, where he lived until his last day.